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Rep. Ted Deutch: Crist-Rich Democratic primary debate would be ‘worthwhile’

by George Bennett | April 18th, 2014

Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, at a town hall meeting west of Boynton Beach on Thursday night.


U.S. Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Boca Raton, isn’t taking sides in the Democratic primary for governor between Charlie Crist and Nan Rich.

But Deutch sounds sympathetic to calls from underdog Rich — and Republican Gov. Rick Scott — for Crist to debate his Democratic primary rival.

After conducting a town hall meeting with more than 100 people west of Boynton Beach, Deutch was asked by a reporter Thursday night if Crist and Rich should debate.

“I think it would worthwhile for the people of Florida to be reminded of the issues that most people in the state care about, which would be the issues that are debated that night, instead of being forced to watch millions of dollars in commercials funded by outside groups that support the governor,” Deutch said.

Scott also thinks Republican-turned-Democrat Crist should debate former state Sen. Rich. Scott made the suggestion after Crist, in West Palm Beach this week, declared “Give me Scott.”

Scott Facebook townhall features unfriend-ly swipes at Crist

by John Kennedy | April 17th, 2014

Gov. Rick Scott takes part in a Facebook townhall from Jacksonville.

Gov. Rick Scott hosted a Facebook townhall Thursday evening from Jacksonville, fielding one question about Charlie Crist while also managing to take a couple swipes at his Democratic rival.

Asked about Crist’s “Gimme Scott” comment this week at a Forum Club meeting in West Palm Beach, Scott shrugged off the challenge. Instead, Scott hinted that Crist shouldn’t look too far past his likely Democratic primary opponent, Nan Rich.

“That’s laughable,” Scott posted. “He has a primary and I’m sure it’s going to be enjoyable watching his debates with Nan Rich.”

But Scott also kept his focus on Crist when another Facebook friend asked if Floridians could face higher taxes if they failed to have health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, dubbed Obamacare.

“Charlie Crist thinks Obamacare is ‘great,’” Scott responded. “I don’t because people are losing their insurance, their doctors and their jobs because of this failed law.

Scott also vowed to hold the line on college and university tuition this year. Unlike, he pointed out, Crist, who as Republican governor from 2007-11, endorsed a law which allowed tuition to climb 15 percent annually.

“We are working to stop the 15% annual increase in tuition plus inflationary increase in tuition passed by Charlie Crist. Call your state legislators and let them know this is important,” Scott told his online audience.

But just as in previous Facebook townhalls, Scott chose to avoid a few questions, too. Several questions went unanswered about why he hasn’t pushed to expand Medicaid to cover some of Florida’s 4 million without health insurance.

Another question challenging Florida for still planning to implement Common Core Standards in classrooms got a less than direct answer from Scott.

“There are two things important to me, one, high standards for Florida students are not negotiable; and two we must prevent the federal government’s overreach into our education system,” he said.

 

 

Tuition break for immigrants gains high-profile Senate opponents

by John Kennedy | April 17th, 2014

House Speaker Will Weatherford’s push to grant in-state tuition to children of undocumented immigrants gained a couple of high-profile opponents Thursday in the Florida Senate.

Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, sent an email newsletter to voters in his Panhandle district assuring them that he would not vote the the measure. And Senate Budget Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, followed that with a statement outlining reasons why he won’t schedule the bill in his committee.

With the legislative session entering its final two weeks on Monday, the legislation (SB 1400, CS/HB 851) seen as designed to help Republicans woo Hispanic voters this fall is clearly in jeopardy.

“In-state tuition discounts should, in my view, be reserved for legal residents of Florida,” Negron said. “Florida law does not prohibit students who are undocumented from accessing our state colleges and universities.

“Once these students favorably resolve their residency status, they could become eligible for in-state tuition,” he concluded.

Weatherford, however, wasn’t ready to call the measure dead Thursday.

“There are a lot of folks praying for these kids.,” Weatherford said. “Two weeks is a long time and I remain optimistic.”

The House last month OK’d in-state tuition with the support of Democrats and more than half the Republican caucus, with Weatherford spearheading the change. But the issue remains explosive within the Florida GOP, where tea party conservatives have railed against the measure as giving a benefit to those here illegally.

Average nonresident tuition is $21,434 annually, compared with the in-state average of $6,318.

Gov. Rick Scott, as a 2010 candidate pledged to fight for tougher immigration controls in Florida but did little once elected. Scott has confined his comments on the legislation to echoing support for lowering tuition costs for Florida students, without addressing how the bill extends that privilege to undocumented immigrants.

With a bruising governor’s race underway, the tuition bill appeared primed to be a GOP peace offering to Hispanics, who have increasingly sided with Democratic candidates.

President Obama has embraced such legislation as part of Dream Act efforts to grant residency status to undocumented aliens. Obama has overwhelmingly carried the Florida Hispanic vote the past two presidential elections.

After one week, Crist spokesman ‘pursuing other opportunities’

by George Bennett | April 17th, 2014

A week after he was announced as media contact for Charlie Crist‘s gubernatorial campaign, Eric Conrad and the campaign have parted ways.

“He’s pursuing other opportunities,” was all Crist communications consultant Kevin Cate would say this afternoon.

Conrad, who has worked in Florida with President Barack Obama‘s 2012 re-election campaign, the Florida Democratic Party and Enroll America, didn’t immediately return a call.

It’s the second time Republican-turned-Democrat Crist’s camp has seen a rapid departure from a visible post.

When he launched his campaign in November, Crist planned to bring Democratic hot hand Bill Hyers on as campaign manager after Hyers helmed Bill De Blasio‘s mayoral victory in New York. But Hyers never actually started on the job; Crist said he “wanted to stay in New York because it was good for him.” Crist eventually hired former Obama operative Omar Khan as campaign manager.

Sens. Nelson, Rubio to join Thursday to discuss Venezuela crisis

by George Bennett | April 16th, 2014

Nelson in West Palm Beach today.

Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson and Republican Sen. Marco Rubio will appear together at a restaurant in Doral on Thursday to show solidarity with members of the Venezuelan community while the country’s leftist government continues its crackdown on dissent.

“Sen. Rubio and I have cosponsored a number of resolutions, we have written letters as well and we have a very similar opinion about what should be the posture of the United States (toward) this very repressive regime in Venezuela that is allowing its own people to be killed by these, in essence, paramilitaries or authorized gangs,” Nelson said today while stopping by his field office in West Palm Beach City Hall.

“We want to see economic sanctions clamp down, severe ones, on the repressive and dictatorial government of Venezuela,” Nelson said.

“Sen. Rubio and I, on this issue, there is no daylight between us and one of the surprises you’ll see in the interaction between us in the press conference, you think that Democrats and Republicans don’t get along, Sen. Rubio and I get along very, very well and so much of what we do you never see, for example, the selection of federal judges…It is a pleasure to deal with Sen. Rubio on a lot of the everyday detailed stuff that we do in the U.S. Senate.”

For all his pleasurable dealings with Rubio, Nelson said he had no insight into whether Rubio will launch a 2016 presidential bid.

“I don’t know” if Rubio will run, said Nelson, who’s a big Hillary Clinton fan. “I’m going to leave that to others. Really, when it comes to the presidential race I think it’s clear that we’re going to have the first woman president and what an incredible talent she is and we’re going to be fortunate to have her as our president.”

Scott’s reelection story gets another chapter in latest TV spot

by John Kennedy | April 16th, 2014

Gov. Rick Scott's latest TV ad looks back on his Navy days

Gov. Rick Scott Wednesday launched the second installment of the bi0-pic approach his campaign is using to reintroduce him to Florida voters.

Like his opening TV ad, the newest 30-second spot airing statewide reflects on multimillionaire’s hardscrabble growing up. The ad reflects on his years right out of high school, when he served in the U.S. Navy and later went to college on the G.I. Bill before starting his first business.

Scott’s late mother, Esther, a fixture in his 2010 campaign, also is featured in the spot. She died in late 2012.

“You know, everyone deserves the dignity and the opportunity that comes with a good job,” Scott tells viewers. “That’s what I work on every day.”

Here’s the ad:   bit.ly/1jLhcCN

 

Watchdog groups urge action on ethics bills in session’s homestretch

by John Kennedy | April 16th, 2014

Watchdog groups Wednesday urged Florida lawmakers to finalize ethics proposals that would strengthen access to public records and require more lobbyists to register and disclose how much they get paid.

Both measures have cleared the Senate, but are languishing in the House. The Legislature returns from a Passover-Easter break on Monday to begin the session’s last scheduled two weeks.

Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, have touted ethics reforms as a central part of their two-year term as leaders. This year’s proposals could represent a postscript to steps taken last year, which included a revamping of how political fund-raising committees operate.

Dan Krassner, executive director of Integrity Florida, a government oversight group, said lawmakers need to enhance last year’s moves.

“We encourage our legislative leaders to build on these small steps and pass major ethics reform and open government legislation in the remaining two weeks,” Krassner said.

Among those calling for action were representatives of the First Amendment Foundation, Common Cause of Florida, the Citizens Awareness Foundation and Tea Party Network.

Barbara Petersen, president of the news organization-backed First Amendment Foundation, said that while 250 public records exemptions existed in 1985, that number could climb to 1,100 if some two-dozen proposed loopholes are created this year.

One bill (SB 1648) pushed by advocates Wednesday clarifies issues involving fees for public records, including those sought by citizens and later costs run up by attorneys seeking documents. It also requires more training of government employees to satisfy the demands of Florida’s open records laws.

The other measure (SB 846) seen as a priority by open government advocates would require lobbyists working the state’s almost 1,000 independent special districts to register and publicly disclose how much they get paid.

Palm Beach County, alone, has more than 60 such districts, ranging from the huge South Florida Water Management District to municipal airport, port, drainage and community development districts.

Billions of taxpayer dollars flow through these districts.

“Certainly, our state lawmakers are outnumbered by lobbyists nearly 12-to-1,” Krassner said. “The lobbying community…is very powerful in our state Capitol. Any measure that looks to require more disclosure from lobbyists is going to face some resistance.”

Frankel headed to Ukraine, says ‘my mother is not happy’

by George Bennett | April 16th, 2014

Frankel speaking at a 55+ community west of Delray Beach today.

U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, D-West Palm Beach, will head to Ukraine on Thursday along with other members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

“My mother is not happy” with her visit to the international trouble spot, Frankel told about two dozen retirees at the Bridgeview community west of Delray Beach.

Frankel said she doesn’t know many details about her itinerary.

In an interview, Frankel said she’s had several meetings on Ukraine, including a dinner last week with about a dozen members of Congress and about six ambassadors from Eastern Europe.

“Their take is they are very worried,” Frankel said of the Eastern Europeans. “Some of them are just worried about us getting back into a Cold War kind of situation. I don’t think anybody really trusts (Russian President Vladimir) Putin.”

Frankel added: “There’s absolutely no talk of any military action at all. I don’t even think that’s possible. But there’s other discussions: What do we provide to people in Ukraine? But that’s something I hope we’re going to explore on the ground when we talk to some of the leaders there.”

Did Republican Domino spend $42,087 to raise $31,840 in congressional race?

by George Bennett | April 15th, 2014

Carl Domino (left) and other Republican congressional candidates at a January forum.


UPDATED 5 PM – Former state Rep. Carl Domino, considered the leading Republican candidate to challenge freshman Democratic Rep. Patrick Murphy, listed $42,087 in fundraising expenses during the first quarter of 2014 while collecting only $31,840 in contributions.

Domino adviser Larry Casey said this morning that the campaign mislabeled some of its expenditures.

“Our fault in descriptions…many of those items listed as fundraising were not fundraising,” Casey said in an e-mail. He said the campaign will amend its Federal Election Commission report.

Late in the day, the Domino camp filed an amended FEC report reclassifying many of the expenditures it previously described as being for fundraising. The campaign now says it spent only $10,492 in the quarter on fundraising.

Murphy raised $674,369 during the quarter and began April with $2.2 million in cash on hand for his re-election bid in Palm Beach-Treasure Coast District 18.

Domino’s campaign spent a total of $68,301 between Jan. 1 and March 31, according to the latest Federal Election Commission report, with the majority of the expenditures specifically identified as being for “fundraising” in some way.

Read the rest of this entry »

Burt Aaronson, recovering from heart surgery, makes appearance at Crist speech

by George Bennett | April 14th, 2014

Crist and Aaronson at Kravis Center today.


Six weeks after having a heart valve replaced and receiving a pacemaker, former Palm Beach County commissioner Burt Aaronson is slowly returning to the local political scene.

Aaronson, 85, put in an appearance at a Democratic Club of Greater Boynton meeting last week and today was on hand at the Kravis Center for former Gov. Charlie Crist‘s speech to the Forum Club of the Palm Beaches.

Former Rep. Ron Klein, State Attorney Dave Aronberg and former Commissioner Burt Aaronson.

Aaronson was term-limited as a commissioner in 2012 but remains an influential figure in south-county Democratic politics. He has been a key supporter of former Republican Crist, vouching for him to Democratic clubs and frequently serving as his chauffeur.

Chauffeur duties have been put on hold, said Aaronson, who said doctors have told him not to drive long distances. He got a ride to the Kravis Center today with Boca Raton Councilman Robert Weinroth.

Aaronson and former state Sen. Steve Geller.

“This is too important of an election for me to only worry about myself,” Aaronson said.

Former Democratic state Sen. Steve Geller, a key Crist ally in Broward County, was also at the Kravis Center for Crist’s speech.

“This is Palm Beach, not Broward. It’s your duty to watch him, not mine,” Geller joked to Aaronson.

First Amendment Foundation urges Scott veto of warning shot bill

by John Kennedy | April 14th, 2014

A measure that would allow Floridians to fire a warning shot in self-defense should be vetoed by Gov. Rick Scott because it also closes key criminal records from public oversight, the First Amendment Foundation said Monday.

The foundation, which is financed by Florida news organizations, wrote Scott urging that he veto the legislation (CS/HB 89) he is expected to act on this week.

The bill would give those who threaten to use a firearm in self-defense or fire a warning shot instead of fleeing a dangerous situation the same legal safeguards that the state’s “stand your ground” law gives to people who use deadly force to defend themselves.

The 2005 stand your ground provision is opposed by minority groups which claim it has been used to justify violence against black youth.

The press organization, however, addresses the provision that allows people cleared by judges because they acted in self-defense to petition courts to have their records expunged.

Barbara Petersen, foundation president, told Scott that could “serve as a tool for obscuring law enforcement and prosecutorial misconduct, while also hindering the development of court precedence essential to understanding how and when the proposed use of force applies.”

When the bill cleared the Senate earlier this month, Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness, a former sheriff, defended the expungement section. “An innocent person is innocent,” Dean told the Senate. “You shouldn’t have to defend your name for the rest of your life.”

Charlie Crist: Reporter George Bennett tweets from the Forum Club

by Palm Beach Post Staff | April 14th, 2014

Follow Post politics writer George Bennett’s live tweets from the Forum Club of the Palm Beaches, where Democratic gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist is the featured speaker about noon, and where Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, the running mate of Republican Gov. Rick Scott, plans to be available to respond.


Murphy, Frankel cite ’77 cents’ statistic on women’s earnings; their staffs have bigger gender pay gaps

by George Bennett | April 14th, 2014

Democratic Reps. Patrick Murphy and Lois Frankel


Democratic Reps. Patrick Murphy and Lois Frankel joined President Barack Obama and other Democrats last week in promoting “Equal Pay Day” and its much-repeated statistic that women earn 77 cents for every dollar men are paid.

In Murphy’s and Frankel’s congressional offices, the gap between the average earnings of male and female staffers is even greater. Subscribers to MyPalmBeachPost.com can find more detail and context in this week’s Politics column.

A review of House records shows Murphy and Frankel provide similar pay to men and women who hold similar jobs. But women outnumber men in lower-paying jobs on both staffs, dragging down the overall female average compared to men.

Read the rest of this entry »

Crist to speak at Forum Club, Lopez-Cantera to be on hand for instant comment

by George Bennett | April 14th, 2014

Carlos Lopez-Cantera, giving a no vote as state House majority leader in 2011, could reprise his thumbs-down role today when he attends Charlie Crist's speech at the Forum Club. (Florida House of Representatives photo)


Charlie Crist, the former Republican governor who’s now the leading Democratic contender for the job, will speak to a Forum Club of the Palm Beaches lunch at the Kravis Center today.

Republican Gov. Rick Scott‘s campaign is making sure that whatever Crist says won’t go unanswered.

Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera will attend “and will be available to reporters following the event,” according to an advisory from Scott’s re-election campaign.

Follow @gbennettpost on Twitter beginning around noon for real-time updates.

In a year of budget plenty, waiting lists for elderly, disabled trimmed only a little

by John Kennedy | April 13th, 2014

Despite a year of plenty for state lawmakers, with overall spending almost certain to hit record levels, relatively meager increases proposed for elderly and disabled programs do little to scale back the massive backlog of Floridians seeking aid.

The state’s waiting lists for elderly long-term health services, community care, Alzheimer’s Disease assistance and help for people with disabilities would shrink by only modest percentages, despite a $1.2 billion surplus of state revenue fueling rival $75 billion House and Senate budget proposals.

Lawmakers are touting this year’s plan to spend roughly $37 million to reduce the number of elderly Floridians awaiting services. But legislators acknowledge the line won’t really be shortened by much.

With the nation’s largest number of people over age 65, Florida has a 9,000-person waiting list for community care services that help keep the elderly in their homes. Advocates say the number of people seeking services could actually be more than three times that.

But in its budget, House is looking to take 751 people off the waiting list; the Senate would add 601 Floridians for care.

Either way, less than 10 percent of those seeking coverage will gain services.

“This is penny-wise and pound-foolish not to spend more,” said David Bruns, spokesman for AARP-Florida. “The cost of people going into nursing homes is so much more. But (legislators) are taking such a small step.”

Full story here:  bit.ly/1kUJURa

 

In GOP primary to replace cocaine congressman, ‘We need to stop all this negativity’

by George Bennett | April 11th, 2014

State Senate Majority Leader Lizbeth Benacquisto greets a voter after a Republican congressional debate Wednesday in Fort Myers.

Over on Florida’s west coast, a nasty Republican primary is winding down for the seat of former Rep. Trey Radel, who resigned in January after being busted for cocaine possession.

Among the combatants: state Senate Majority Leader Lizbeth Benacquisto, who got her start in politics on the Wellington village council and has landed endorsements from Sarah Palin and Mike Huckabee.

The race features a big-spending outsider, Curt Clawson, who made a splash by spending $200,000 to run ads during the Super Bowl that showed him draining three-pointers (he’s a former Purdue basketball player) and challenging President Barack Obama to a shooting contest.

Former state Rep. Paige Kreegel and businessman Michael Dreikorn are also running in the April 22 prmary, which this week featured a rare three-candidate news conference to discuss a Utah sex offender.

“We need to stop all this negativity,” said Dreikorn (who, coincidentally, is the only candidate who can’t afford TV ads).

Subscribers to MyPalmBeachPost.com can read more about it by clicking here.

Private school voucher bill scaled back again to woo Senate

by John Kennedy | April 9th, 2014

A measure beefing-up the state’s private school voucher program launched under former Gov. Jeb Bush was reworked again Wednesday by the House in a bid to reach accord with a resistent Senate.

The legislation (HB 7167) was amended by House sponsor Rep. Manny Diaz, R-Miami, to eliminate a proposed expansion of the dollar caps that limit the growth of the program.

The bill now maintains the current caps that allow annual 25 percent increases from the current $286 million in tax credits, which pays for almost 60,000 low-income students to attend 1,400, mostly faith-based private schools.

Facing earlier opposition, Diaz has already dropped an initial plan to allow companies to steer a portion of their state sales-tax obligation to the program.

The Tax Credit Scholarship Program, created in 2002, gives corporations dollar-for-dollar tax credits for donations they make to finance private school scholarships for children from low-income households.

While scaled-back, the House proposal does continue to expand the pool of students who could be eligible for taxpayer scholarships. House Republicans also beat back Democratic efforts to require that these private-school students undergo standardized testing like that in public schools.

Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, has said he won’t go along with any expansion for the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship program without a testing provision — and his son, Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Shalimar, broke party ranks to join Democrats in those losing votes on the House floor.

The younger Gaetz’s stand may signal that the bill still faces a stern test in the Senate, which earlier dropped any plans to consider an expansion bill unless mandatory testing was included.

Rep. Janet Adkins, R-Fernandina Beach, defended maintaining a distinction between the taxpayer-funded private school students and those who go to public schools.

“Why would we want to make it look just like the school that didn’t work for these children?” Adkins said.

While close to 60,000 students received scholarships this year, demand is much greater, with almost 94,000 applications made by families, according to Step Up for Students, the Tampa-based nonprofit which administers the program.

The nonprofit also says scholarship students are subject to testing, with most taking Stanford Achievement tests at private schools.

Step Up for Students, this year can collect 3 percent for administrative costs, or $8.6 million. And with the program on pace to spend $873.6 million by 2018, Step Up for Students would be poised to collect $26.2 million that year for office costs and salaries – an amount ridiculed Wednesday by Democrats.

 

Pressure, and a change of heart gives new life to Richardson bill in House

by John Kennedy | April 8th, 2014

A former fruit picker convicted but later cleared of committing one of the most brutal mass murders in Florida history edged closer Tuesday to becoming eligible for more than $1 million in state compensation.

The House Criminal Justice Subcommittee voted 11-0 to approve a bill (HB 227) created to help James Richardson, accused of killing his seven children by poisoning them with insecticide in the DeSoto County town of Arcadia, just days before Halloween 1967.

Richardson spent 21 ½ years in prison — including four years on Death Row—before being released in 1989 after then-Dade State Attorney Janet Reno was appointed by Gov. Bob Martinez to review the case.

Reno found wide-ranging misconduct by criminal investigators and prosecutors.

While Richardson was behind bars, a babysitter for the children, Betsy Reese, told neighbors that she had killed them, but was never charged.

Rep. Dave Kerner, D-Lake Worth, sponsor of the bill, said he was drawn to the case because he had served as a police officer in North Florida and is aware of the state’s “legacy of injustice.”

“I always said that I would do everything I could to correct wrongs of the past,” Kerner said following Tuesday’s hearing. “I believe in this particular instance, that’s what happened back in 1967.”

The legislation, however, drew a hearing Tuesday only after the Florida Legislative Black Caucus appealed to House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel.

Subcommittee Chairman Matt Gaetz, R-Shalimar, had refused to schedule a hearing on the measure, telling the Palm Beach Post that he had problems with a bill cast to help only one person. On Tuesday, however, Gaetz said his thinking had changed.

Gaetz said he had spoken with Kerner and had become convinced the legislation was needed to fix, “a systemic loophole that one person fell through.”

Bill tightening oversight of summer camp employees advances in Senate

by John Kennedy | April 8th, 2014

A measure aimed at tightening state oversight of summer camp employees, inspired by a 2012 Palm Beach Post series on abuses in the current system, cleared a Senate panel Tuesday.

The bill (SB 1424) by Sen. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, was approved by the Children, Families and Elder Affairs Committee. It would authorize the state’s Department of Children & Families to create a statewide database containing names of summer camp personnel, who have cleared a state-required criminal background check.

The proposal follows a Post investigation that found convicted child molesters and other felons had worked at or owned summer camps throughout the state. Clemens and Rep. Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, have since been pushing to pass a law requiring the statewide registry of summer camps.

DCF took early steps at creating a database last year, but apparently could not proceed without further authorization by the Legislature.

In the past. legislative leaders, including House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, said the burden should be on parents – and not the state — to ensure that camp operators are conducting the background checks. Some Republican lawmakers also balked at an earlier $3 million price tag analysts said would be associated with creating the registry. It was unclear Tuesday whether that cost endured under the current proposal.

The action Tuesday was the bill’s first hearing in either the House or Senate.

Dems target Domino and Turnquest with web ads, robocalls blasting Ryan budget

by George Bennett | April 7th, 2014

With House Republicans expected to vote this week on Budget Chairman Paul Ryan‘s spending blueprint, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is paying for web ads and robocalls that single out two of the six Republicans running for the nationally targeted Palm Beach-Treasure Coast District 18 seat of freshman Rep. Patrick Murphy, D-Jupiter.

Former state Rep. Carl Domino and former Tequesta councilman Calvin Turnquest are the targets of “Don’t Sell Out The Middle Class” web ads that launched last week and automated phone calls beginning today.

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