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Class size amendment stays on ballot

by Dara Kam | October 7th, 2010

A proposed constitutional amendment that would water down class size limits will remain on the ballot, the Florida Supreme Court ruled today.

Lawmakers placed the measure, Amendment 8, on the ballot to give school districts more flexibility meeting the constitutional restrictions on class sizes approved by voters in 2002. The proposal would keep class size limits at the school average level rather than require each class to comply with the limits.

The Florida teachers’ union argued that the measure is really intended to decrease the amount of money lawmakers must spend on public education.

Today’s unanimous decision upheld a lower court ruling.

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12 Responses to “Class size amendment stays on ballot”

  1. Bill Says:

    Wow, Dara. Great, unbiased reporting there– the amendment would WATER DOWN the class size. Is your thesaurus broken? Can’t find the word change or even “increase” is less biased than water down. idiot reporters who have a political ax to grind– Americans are sick of it

  2. Parent Says:

    @Bill;

    This is exactly what Amendment 8 will do…”water down” the current class size mandate. It goes from 18 to 21 students in early grades, 22 to 27 students in Middle School, and 25 to 30 students in High School classes.

    If that isn’t “watering it down”, then I don;t know what is. The real issue is that the Florida Legislature is derelict of duty in adequately funding education. They are solely responsible for the current “flexibility” issues, and this backwards amendment hurts our kids.

    Vote NO on Amendment 8!

  3. Unreal Says:

    Bill,

    So you attack a reporter for using a phrase to describe the effect of legislation rather than the legislation itself. Sounds like you have some agenda of your own.

    Actually by saying that the Amendment would provide more flexibility for the government appears to be a favorable position.

    Did you read past the first sentence?

    It appears posters lately seem to want to shoot the messenger over issues that they do not like, rather than taking in the information being provided.

    I am a very conservative person, and a Tea Partier before the Tea Party ever came back into being, but you sir seem to be one of those wacked out right winger extremists who can’t seem to explicate (look it up in your thesaurus if you don’t know) your ideas properly and are reduced to personal attacks and slander.
    Its no wonder i left the GOP when people like you are representative of that segment of America.

  4. swathdiver Says:

    Vote YES on 8!

    Competent teachers can handle a couple extra rugrats in their classrooms.

    The old law was a sop to the unions for growing government on the backs of the taxpayers.

  5. Jan Says:

    Great!

    So make that a YES for Amendment 8

    it needs 60% passage to succeed.

    Pass the word on…

  6. Lisa Says:

    Side with Bill on the wording of this article. It does show a bias.

    What if that term, ‘watered down’ was used to describe Alex Sink’s response to a question?

    The phrase show prejudice and we know where some people are blinded in their passion however wrong or right.

    balance is important.

  7. Cranky Yankee Says:

    For those of you who think increasing class size is no problem, let’s take a look. It’s not the unions that advocated for smaller classes-it’s the educational experts. Pooh-pooh to the educational experts you say? Is that because you THINK you know more than someone who has spent the past 25-45 years actually working in the field? Even conservatives admit that smaller class sizes are a good idea. How many of you educational cheapskates could raise a family with 20-25 kids, all the same age? Most parents can’t even handle the demands of 2-3, let alone a full classroom, and now they want to tell teachers they need to have more kids.

    The reality is that in order to have smaller classes, you have to have more teachers. That’s a mathematical fact. The legislature, a conservative one at that under JEB Bush, set the class size limits, but they failed to properly fund the mandate. Conservatives did it. Don’t you get that. Leave it alone and vote No on Amendment 8.

  8. swathdiver Says:

    Vote No on 8 Cranky Yankee!

    Ask a baby boomer how many kids were in their classes when growing up.

    Back in the one-room school house days teachers taught all ages in the same classroom. The kids back then in the 8th grade were as proficient in the 3 Rs as college graduates today.

    Religion and Morality are the bedrock upon which an effective education is built upon. Now that they’ve been removed from most households and the public schools chaos reigns because none of them know how to self-govern.

  9. Jack Gillies Says:

    You want to take care of the students?

    Stop illegal immigration!

  10. swathdiver Says:

    OOOPSKK!!!

    VOTE YES ON 8 Cranky Yankee!!!

    :-)

  11. Sam Says:

    There is a way to reduce class size, keep the same amount of teachers and reduce funding. Know how? ENFORCE OUR IMMIGRATION LAWS.

  12. Chris Says:

    I am kind of torn on whether to vote yes or no on this. I can see both sides, but have a few problems with each. If the amendment passes then our already underpaid teachers esentially will be taking a pay cut. More work same pay. I think there should be more to the amendment that gives a pay raise to the teachers that will now be getting even more overworked. Oh, but wait a minute, I forgot, the reason they say we need this amendment in the first place is because we can’t affford to pay more teachers. I think I am leaning more toward voting no in hopes that the State has to add more classes, which will in turn create more jobs, which will hopefully force the State’s hand in re budgeting some money for our schools. But who am i kidding, they will re budget the money, but they will take it from something we need and continue funding things we don’t need!

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